Bat Control

Bats are the subject of old horror movies, popular as a Halloween decoration, and are often referred to as “blind.”  

ALL SPECIES OF BATS ARE PROTECTED IN THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA and are listed as SPECIES OF SPECIAL CONCERN.  More information HERE 

STATE LAWS REGARDING BATS ARE AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PAGE (under construction)

Bats are a wonderful and beneficial member of the mammal family, and are the only mammals with wings. Taking to the desert skies at night, they consume insects, pollinate plants and disburse plant seed.  Worldwide, there are over 1,100 species of bats. 40 of those species are found in the United States, and California is home to more than 25 of those species.  

While bats do use caves and old mines in which to live, some desert species tend to live in cracks and crevices in-between large rocks, under tree bark, etc., while others live in trees.  They drink while flying just above water sources, skimming the surface. Many species will eat their own weight in insects every night.

Mexican Free Tailed Bat, native to California.  Photo USFWS

Sometimes bats choose to roost and raise young in places they aren’t meant to be.  An unsecured attic is a popular choice.   Should bats choose an attic, they can cause a of damage, and deposit large amounts of guano (bat feces.)  Bat guano often contains micro organisms that can make people sick.   Bats may also be carriers of Rabies.

Sometimes a bat will fly in through an open window, entering the living area of a home. 

It is very important, in either circumstance, to enlist the services of a trained wildlife control professional-and never an exterminator, for humane and safe bat removal.  Some pest control operators use unscrupulous practices-sometimes killing entire colonies of bats, which is illegal.

Be certain you are consulting with a licensed wildlife control operator, one who is trained in the humane techniques used in removing bats from your home, warehouse, or other enclosed areas. 

FGC § 2118 (b)

It is unlawful to import, transport, possess, or release alive into this state, except under a revocable, nontransferable permit as provided in this chapter and the regulations pertaining thereto, any wild animal of the following species: 

Order Chiroptera (bats): All species.